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Graduate

Degrees Offered

Master of Arts in Historical Studies. In addition to a wide range of subject/area specialties, the M.A. includes the option of a track in Public History. Note: the Public Policy Ph.D program offers a concentration in policy history. For further information, contact the Department of History for information about the Policy History Track in the Public Policy Program. The Department of History is also affiliated with the Language, Literacy, and Culture Doctoral Program.

Contact Information

Interim Graduate Program Director:

Dr. Anne Sarah Rubin  (Spring 2014)
Office: 724 Administration Building
Telephone: 410-455-2035

Graduate Program Administrative Assistant:
Ms. Carla Ison
732 Administration Building
410-455-2312


The Master of Arts program in Historical Studies

M.A. Program Description

The Master of Arts program in Historical Studies is designed to accommodate a variety of interests and career paths, including students who are considering going on for a Ph.D. as part of the path to a formal academic career in history, those already engaged in K-12 teaching, students seeking to deepen their knowledge of history, or those who wishing to enter the growing field of public history for a career in museums, archives, libraries, or other historical institutions. The program is characterized by a core emphasis on academic training in historiographical methods and theory; in current conceptual tools and techniques for organizing historical evidence; and in primary research in a large number of subject/area specialties. In addition, the program includes the option of a Public History track which offers an opportunity to explore the practice and theory of “public history” in fields such as archival management, historical editing, construction and administration of public history sites, the writing of institutional or policy history, and the use of electronic media techniques in exhibits and Internet sites. The scheduling of courses in the program is arranged to suit full-time students as well as part-time evening students.

The department also offers qualified undergraduates an Accelerated B.A./M.A. program that may culminate in the M.A. in Historical Studies. For further information, contact the History Department’s Graduate Program Director.

Program Admission Requirements and Deadlines

The admission requirements and procedures correspond to the requirements set forth by the Graduate School of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, with the provision that the GRE is required. Applications must include three letters of recommendation that provide information about your potential as a scholar and the ability to engage in the academic work of history at the graduate level. Candidates with questions or concerns regarding such letters are invited to consult with the Graduate Program Director, well before the application deadline.

The admissions deadline is February 15., for admission the following fall.

*Please Note: Applicants wishing to be considered for a graduate assistantship for the upcoming academic year must submit a letter, separate from the graduate school application materials, indicating interest and qualifications to the Graduate Program Director by the same deadline of February 15.

Program Degree Requirements

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required. All students must take HIST 701 (The Study of History) and at least one course in the sequence of area historiographies (HIST 702/703/704). They will normally take at least three courses from the group numbered 705-729 and up to three courses from the group numbered 601-698. Finally, they will take six credits of Master’s Thesis (HIST 799). Special Topics in Historical Studies (HIST 798) may, with permission from the program director, be substituted for some courses in the 601-698 series and 710-729 series. The Internship/Practicum in Historical Studies (HIST 790) may also, with permission from the program director, be substituted for some part of the normal series of courses. Every attempt is made to individualize the student’s total degree program to meet particular interests and career goals.

By the time students have completed 15 credits of graduate work they must select a faculty advisor. The Graduate Program Director should be consulted when selecting an advisor and only members of the Regular or Associate Graduate Faculty in the UMBC Department of History qualify. All students who have completed 15 credits must complete the Declaration of Faculty Advisor Form.

Students must be continuously enrolled in the program unless granted an authorized Leave of Absence (LOA). Students are limited to three authorized LOAs. All requirements for the master’s degree must be completed within a five-year period. See the UMBC Graduate School website for general information on master’s degree programs and important university deadlines.

M.A. Thesis: The thesis in history (six credits of HIST 799) demonstrates a student’s ability to create historical scholarship that integrates both primary and secondary sources. All theses involve working with a faculty advisor and at least two additional faculty as committee members. The thesis includes a substantive writing section examining the historiography of the chosen research topic integrated with the student’s insights. Some theses also include historical scholarship presented in a variety of professional formats such as websites, exhibitions, and lesson plans.

Students ready to begin work on the M.A. thesis should register for 1-3 credits of HIST 799 with the approval of a faculty advisor. Before registering for a fourth credit of HIST 799, students must submit an 8-10 page prospectus to the advisor and thesis committee. The prospectus must be approved by all members of the committee before a student may register for the final 3 credits of HIST 799. (see new “Prospectus Approval Form”). The prospectus should include:

  • Discussion of the major research question
  • Review of the topic’s general historiography
  • Preliminary bibliography and a discussion of the sources to be used
  • Proposed outline

Student must complete six (6) credits of HIST 799 for the M.A. in Historical Studies and pass an oral examination on the thesis.


Subject Area Specialties

Department faculty focus their research and teaching in the following fields: United States history (all periods and several sub-areas including politics and public policy, social history, diplomatic history, economic/business history, urban history, women’s history, military affairs, and race relations/civil rights), Medieval and Byzantine history, the Renaissance, Modern European history (with particular emphasis on Britain, France, Germany, Eastern Europe, history of the Holocaust, and Russia), the history of technology, science and the health-related professions, institutional and policy history, and Asian history with particular emphasis on the history of China and Japan.

Public History Track

What is Public History? Public History is a form of public service. Public historians help create historical understanding by sharing authority and inquiry with a variety of partners, including audiences, museum professionals, preservationists, business leaders and others. Public historians are trained, first and foremost, as historians –to conduct research, to craft interpretations and to write well. However, public historians must also be prepared to work collaboratively with partners for whom an understanding of history can have immediate practical implications. Public historians produce original interpretations that build bridges between scholarship and everyday life by respecting the ways in which their partners and audiences use history, and by balancing professional authority against community needs.

 The Public History Track is an option for students pursuing the Master of Arts in Historical Studies. Our faculty recognizes that dynamic collaborations can produce innovative and relevant historical scholarship. Graduate students in the public history track participate in unique research projects that address needs identified by a variety of non-profit organizations, government entities and community groups. Faculty and students work with community based partners to create insightful historical narratives that advance understanding of the past and enable problem solving in the present by raising important questions about history, identity, place, and power. The public history track provides opportunities for public history students to build a professional portfolio, develop a network of professional contacts, and acquire specialized experience in the field.

Students in the M.A. in Historical Studies seeking the Public History Track certificate must complete the following 9 credits as part of the 30 credits required for the Masters degree (click here for graduate catalog and course descriptions):

HIST 705 Introduction to Public History [3-credits]

HIST 736 Introduction to Oral History [3-credits]

HIST 790 Internship / Practicum [1 internship @ 3-credits]

In addition, students are encouraged to take HIST 711 Practices in Public History [3-credits] as one of their electives.

For more information, contact the Director of Public History:

Dr. Denise Meringolo, Director PHT
410-455-2058

 

History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Professors Joseph Tatarewicz, Ka-che Yip, and others offer several courses in this area. Graduate Students should begin with the two semester introductory course which covers antiquity to 1700 (HIST 645) and 1700 to the present (HIST 646). A Graduate Seminar (HIST 717) is offered each Spring, dealing with topical areas such as: Scientific Exploration, Darwin and Evolution, Science and Technology in the Cold War, Scientific Revolutions, etc. Dr. Yip offers Medicine and Health Care in China periodically. In addition, a variety of other suitable graduate level electives are offered by other departments, such as Professor William Rothstein’s Social History of American Medicine. Archival sources for thesis topics are plentiful in this area, and the UMBC Archives holds important materials in the history of Science Fiction, Microbiology, Epidemiology, and Photography. Some courses and events in the undergraduate HCST program should be of interest to graduate students.


Graduate Assistantships

The Department of History annually awards a limited number of assistantships to students accepted into the Historical Studies graduate program. These confer tuition remission, a stipend of approximately $11,000, and basic health insurance benefits. Both new applicants and continuing students in the Historical Studies program are eligible to apply. Completed applications must be received by March 10th in order to receive full consideration for graduate assistantship funding for the upcoming academic year. Students wanting to be considered for an assistantship must send a separate letter indicating interest and qualifications to the Historical Studies Graduate Program Director, Dr. Anne Rubin. Be sure to also visit the Graduate School and the Graduate Student Association websites for information about other graduate assistantship opportunities for incoming and continuing students.


Graduate Student Listserv

This mailing list is intended to be a forum for graduate students that they can use to exchange ideas, ask questions, and receive announcements. The Graduate School, the Graduate Program Director, faculty, and staff, use this list to communicate with current History Department graduate students. Therefore, all graduate students are required to subscribe to this free service. Go to http://lists.umbc.edu. There you should login with your UMBC username and password. Click on the “Index of Lists” tab and then find the histgrad list. After you reach the histgrad list homepage, click on “Subscribe” and enter the appropriate information. You message will be sent to the list administrator who will confirm your subscription.